The TONGA.ONLINE project in Binga district / Zimbabwe + Sinazongwe district / Zambia

For the Tonga people like me, there is something deeply biblical about the word MULONGA, yet it is a modern story too. One of massive but unshared technology. One of plentiful water but perpetual drought." (Dominic Muntanga)


Since its launch in 2001, the Tonga.Online Project has focused attention on promoting a Tonga voice over the Internet. The aim is to provide people in the Tonga area of Zimbabwe and the Tonga across the Zambezi River in Zambia with access to the world’s most advanced communication tools, so that they may represent themselves to the outside world and reflect upon the social, political and economic environment of both the global and local village in which the Tonga live today.

The project derives its domain name, Mulonga (meaning River), from the local Tonga language. The name reflects the history and needs of the Tonga people. On one level, the Zambezi River, also known as Mulonga, has become a symbol that tells a modern story of the development of massive but unshared technology – the construction of Kariba Dam on Tonga homeland. Mulonga constantly revokes memories of how the Tonga people were displaced, 50 years ago, to make way for the building of this dam. Yet, even today, they are still bypassed by the huge commercial benefits from tourism and electricity that now derive from their former habitat, an environment which has transformed into the vast expanse of water known as Lake Kariba.

Exhibition in Austria: „one man – one note“ - recalling Siachilaba

Invitation to an exhibition and two concerts reflecting on the narratives and interplay of

20 years of cultural exchange between Austria and the Tonga people

12th June – 19th July 2015 at Kunsthaus Deutschvilla in Strobl / Wolfgangsee / Austria


It is now close to 20 years since our late friend and composer Keith Goddard took some Austrian musicians on a journey to Siachilaba to encounter the amazing Ngoma Buntibe music of the Tonga people. With his notion of „one man – one note“ Keith referred not only to this „most extraordinary texture of sound“ but also to the impressive resilience of Tonga culture struggling against great odds.

Syndicate content